How to Start Growing a Walnut Tree

Answer

When grown in a home garden or orchard, walnut trees (genus Juglans) may reach heights of up to 50 feet and spread out to the same width. They provide a thick canopy of shade. There are around 15 species of walnuts, and numerous cultivars have been developed by grafting several walnut species. When nuts are obtained from non-grafted trees that are located in close proximity to your house, however, developing your own walnut tree from seed involves the preparation of the husked nut as well as the soil before planting.

  1. 1. Collect Fresh, Mature Walnuts, Still in the Husks

    Put on some gloves and start gathering the nuts as soon as they start to fall naturally in the fall. Instead of picking them up off the ground, getting the nuts directly from the tree will provide the greatest results. To remove mature nuts from a branch, give it a good shake with your hands or use a piece of plastic tubing. Put the nuts in a bucket to store them. At your house, fill the bucket with enough water to cover the nuts completely.

  2. 2. Soak the Walnuts to Soften the Husks

    It is suggested on the website of Agri Farming that you soak walnuts for up to twenty-four hours in order to soften the husks and make it simpler to remove the kernels. While protecting your hands with gloves, remove the husks from the hard shell of the nut. After being washed in clean water, the nuts should be allowed to dry on some absorbent towelling. Be careful not to let the meat within the shell become too dry, since this might cause the meat to lose its viability. Put the nuts in a plastic bag and make sure the bag is sealed.

  3. 3. Stratify the Seed Nuts for a Few Months

    Before being planted, walnut trees are need to go through a process called stratification, as stated by Tree Plantation. The technique of intentionally inducing a dormant condition in seeds for an extended period of time in order to stimulate germination is known as stratification. Before planting, store the nuts in a refrigerator for 90 to 120 days at temperatures ranging from 34 to 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Before being planted, walnut trees are need to go through a process called stratification, as stated by Tree Plantation. The technique of intentionally inducing a dormant condition in seeds for an extended period of time in order to stimulate germination is known as stratification. During the stratification process, nut seeds should be kept inside of a plastic bag that has been sealed.

  4. 4. Prepare the Bed and Plant the Seeds

    Grow a germination bed in a section of your garden that is big enough to hold all of the walnut seeds that you want to plant, leaving a space of 6 inches in between each seed. To hasten the process of seed germination, position the germination bed so that it receives direct sunlight. Plant cold-stratified seeds in the area that will be farmed at a depth that is just sufficient to cover the seed’s shell. To prevent the moisture from evaporating, cover the seed bed with straw.

  5. 5. Transplant the Walnut Seedlings

    When the seedlings have stems that are 1/4 to 3/8 inches in diameter and are 1 inch above the root collar, which is the region where the plant roots and trunk meet and is distinguished by the flare of lateral roots, transplant them to their permanent locations. During the first two years of their lives, plants should be kept damp but not soaked. For optimal moisture retention, mulch with two to three inches of organic matter.

    Things You Will Need

    • Ripe walnuts in husks

    • Bucket

    • Shovel

    • Gloves

    Tip

    If there are squirrels in the area, you should cover your seed bed with chicken netting to protect the walnuts that are trying to germinate from being eaten by the squirrels.

    Warning

    When working with walnuts, it is important to use protective gloves since the husks, particularly those of black walnuts (Juglans nigra), may leave stains on the hands. Walnuts, in general, are responsible for the production of a chemical known as juglone, which prevents the development of sensitive plants in the vicinity of the tree’s roots or canopy. However, the black walnut tree is the only species of walnut tree that generates considerable levels of juglone, which may really cause problems for other plants that are planted close.